Anthony…

Anthony is an English baby name, meaning “Highly praiseworthy” which comes from a Roman clan name [Mark Antony is the most famous of the Roman clan names…] whilst in the 17th century, the spelling Anthony was associated with the Greek Anthos meaning flower…

rcShown on the left is a typical example of Tetricus II, with an oblong flan. about 17mm, and with Victory advancing to the left…

Barbarous radiates are mostly imitations of the Antoninianus, issued during the Roman Empire;

these so called Barbarous Radiates get their name from two items associated with the coins… the first is the way they were crudely made, hence the old English word Barbarous being used, & secondly there appears to be a prominent radiant crown either around or the worn by the emperor…

when Rome was in the midst of its crises during the Third Century, its western provinces, produced there own coinage due to the lack of small change, although they were not officially recognised they are also not classed or regarded as forgeries, plus being a lot smaller than the standard issues makes them perfect for the use of small change or an early form of tokens.

About Barbarous Radiates: The term “barbarous radiates” refers to the common unofficial imitations made in Gaul and Britain during the period of the so-called “Gallic Empire,” formed in 260 when that part of the Roman Empire was split from the rest under the usurper Postumus (260-269) and lasting until 273 when the Gallo-Roman emperor Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II were forced to abdicate (and were allowed to live in retirement!) in favor of the victorious central emperor Aurelian (270-275). Barbarous radiates imitated current issues, not issues from the distant past, usually of the Gallic emperors. Some, but only a small fraction, imitate coins of the central emperors and the great majority of those are imitations of consecration issues of Claudius II (268-270). An imitation of Galienus is a rare find and it is very unusual to find a barbarous radiate whose prototype must be from Aurelian (270-275) or later. Imitations under Postumus are scarce and mostly close to full size. Imitations under Victorinus area also scarce. They are often smaller than official coins. A large majority of imitations are of Tetricus I and II (270-273). Few of them are nearly full size–most are significantly smaller or much smaller and many are tiny. Unfortunately, the tiny ones rarely show a pleasing design, full-size imitations through are somewhat unusual…


George the Second…

The introduction of a copper coinage in 1672 was a major departure from the practice in previous reigns. During the Commonwealth and early years of Charles II the use of small privately produced token halfpennies and farthings in copper and brass had provided for the small change, necessary in day to day transactions. The new coins were legal tender for amounts up to six pence and comprised both farthings and halfpennies, weighing circa 5.5 gm and 11 gm respectively. Fairly large amounts of these coins were produced until 1679. The reverse featured a seated figure of Britannia, copied from second century Roman coins. It is said that one of Charles II’s mistresses, the Duchess of Richmond, posed for it.
In 1684, because these copper coins had become the subject of extensive counterfeits, it was decided to switch to the use of tin, with a small central copper plug, the theory being that these would be almost impossible to copy. The weights of these coins approximated to those in copper. However, these coins began to corrode badly after a few years and in 1694 the metal reverted to copper. Large numbers of the new copper coins were issued by William III, then ceased during the reign of Queen Anne as it was thought that there were sufficient in circulation. A few farthings of Anne exist, minted in 1714 and at one time were thought to be patterns. This coin provided the inspiration for the halfpenny and farthing coins of George I, known as “Dump” issues because of their small thick flan. This disguised the fact that their weights were somewhat lower than those of previous reigns, circa 5 gm and 10 gm respectively.

shown below is George I “Dump” halfpenny 1717, due to its thick dumpy feel… g1dumphlfpenrevg1dumphlfpenobv

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Those of George II reverted to a more normal flan thickness and were produced almost g2earlyhalfpennyrev.jpgcontinuously until 1763, some posthumously, the last coins of the reign bearing a date frozen at 1754…   g2earlyhalfpennyobv.jpg


one of the easy ways to id one George from another is the style of there hair laureate, and which way they face… or another way if the legend on the bust [head] side is visible, the first George did not have a I, where as the following George ‘s  had on the bust side the roman numeral II or III  respectively…
g3earlyfarthingobv.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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