Is it Artefact or Artifact…

Well after a historical struggle, we finally triumphed over the Americans, as Artefact is the British spelling of the [noun] which mean that an object has been shaped & formed by humans, more so in the archaeological term…

Although Artifact is the American spelling, it was not until the early  nineteen ninety’s after a struggle between the two spellings, that “what we now know” is the “English” version, took the upper hand, after fighting throughout most of the twentieth century, this is why a lot of publications on Archaeological subjects throughout the 20th century show both spellings and can get somewhat confusing, yet historically it has always been spelt with an I, why people have to complicate matters is beyond me, as I daresay we spelt Artefact with i first, then along came an English professor &  said grammatically it was wrong, & needs to be corrected;


What we are trying to achieve here;

Understanding… so many of the Artefacts that are found or has been found, are just parts of something bigger, and so to gain an understanding of what “has been found” is relevant to a much bigger picture…

Now its whether you found an ID on this website or one that we point you too, it does not matter, whatsoever, as long it has been ID, then our aim has been achieved, so click on, any of the highlighted words to be taken to more sites, some of these sites are “age-specific” whereas others cover a multitude of ages…


Cannon Balls…

if your lucky enough to find this ordnance, then this guide will give you an idea of what you have found…


Lead & more lead, every metal detectorist has at some stage found so much lead, it drives you nuts; from the humble musket ball to the pilgrims badge, all made from the most naturally occurring malleable substance know to man, yet has strength for its purpose, for example a musket ball being spherical, does not lose its shape when fired from a musket…

When you find a musket ball, have you ever stopped to wonder, if it was fired in anger, at another human being, & not at an animal for dinner, this could be from an unsettled period of our time, such as the revolution, when England was without a king, the conflict that pitched brother against brother or neighbour against neighbour..

Image result for musket ballsImage result for musket balls
some typical examples of size & weight are shown below;

22.92g, 0.31 inch diameter – 18thC French

40.51g, 0.776 inch 17thC English
31.02g, 0.697 inch 18thC English Musket balls are manufactured by pouring molten lead or another alloy into a two part single or a multiple cavity mould. The casting sprue is cut close to the ball and any flashing around the mould seam is shaved off. Mould seam – is a thin line around the circumference of the musket ball. Casting Sprue – a small raised cylinder from the lead inlet channel in the mould. This is usually clipped off close to the surface of the ball, If you excavate a musket ball that is round, has a mould seam and a casting sprue then it was probably dropped and not fired. However not all dropped musket balls have a mould seam or casting sprue. because lead is so soft when being transported,  various methods can erase this line by rubbing together in transit. When the diameter is measured this can be used to determine the caliber. The difference between the ball and the caliber is known as windage. Typically the windage is approximately 0.05- 0.10mm. An example is a military British Brown Bess has a bore of 0.75 inches or 75 caliber, but would take a 0,693 inch diameter musket ball. A 69 caliber French Charleyville musket usually took a 0.63 inch ball. However, during the 17th/18thC musket balls were categorized not by diameter but as to how many musket balls would weigh a pound. For example if you had a service “British brown Bess musket” you would have purchased 29, at any given time as that, was weighed in at two pounds.

Most of us who have found a pigeon ring have at some point wondered how to read them, or maybe how to decipher the letters and numbers wrote on these tiny little things… some of the pointers are listed below, as it appears not many Racers worry about where they are or at all interested in there fate…which seem strange…obvisiously you can tell the date as it is quite clearly printed on the ring…

GB = Great Britain which is a representation of  the Royal Racing Pigeon Association

NEHU = North of England Homing Union

QHU = Wales Homing Union

NWHU = North West Homing Union

SU = Scottish Homing Union

 


Coin Tickets – Blank ID Circles Etc…

Once you have started to accumulate Coins & Artefacts,  whether you have found them or buying them, its good practice to think about a method to log each item, as clear identification of coins & artefacts are an important part of any collection, not only that  it saves you having to keep looking up the facts, this is where these little chaps come in, they are blank with the capabilities to write on both sides without any ink bleeding through, these come in various sizes to match the size of the slot in the coin tray, with a little practise an untold amount of information can be stored on these little fellows, one important piece of information is that the date the Coin Ticket was created be included on that ticket, as now that ticket will travel with that coin forever, as it is now part of that coin or artefacts history, so what else needs to be included, well mostly all that you need to write on these Coin Tickets is who is on the coin (king, queen, emperor etc) then the denomination, age, reference work [this can be abbreviated]  etc…one neat trick is for the Coin Ticket to be used as a coin ! give the coin ticket an obverse and reverse… once the photos are ready i will upload them to explain a bit better…

to read further about a paper that was wrote on the importance of these coin tickets click on the link immediately below, then our shop link is below that, if you want some to try…

http://www.britnumsoc.org/publications/Digital%20BNJ/pdfs/2001_BNJ_71_13.pdf

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