Base Coins…

When a hoard is found there various reasons they were buried, we must remember the romans popped over and laid claim to England in our iron age, so we were a developing country at the time, so how was our coins integrated with the roman coins…

Hoarding_in_Iron_Age_and_Roman_Britain_2

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Anthony is an English baby name, meaning “Highly praiseworthy” which comes from a Roman clan name [Mark Antony is the most famous of the Roman clan names…] whilst in the 17th century, the spelling Anthony was associated with the Greek Anthos meaning flower…

rcShown on the left is a typical example of Tetricus II, with an oblong flan. about 17mm, and with Victory advancing to the left…

Barbarous Radiates are mostly imitations of the Antoninianus, issued during the Roman Empire;

These so-called Barbarous Radiates get their name from two items associated with the coins… the first is the way they were crudely made, hence the old English word Barbarous being used, & secondly, there appears to be a prominent radiant crown either around or worn on the emperors head…

When Rome was in the midst of its crises during the Third Century, its western provinces, produced there own coinage due to the lack of small change, although they were not officially recognised they are also not classed or regarded as forgeries, plus being a lot smaller than the standard issues makes them perfect for the use of small change or as some suspect as an early form of a token, but there is no proof of this and it is purely speculation…

The term “barbarous radiates” refers to the common unofficial imitations made in Gaul and Britain during the period of the so-called “Gallic Empire,” formed in 260 when that part of the Roman Empire was split from the rest under the usurper Postumus (260-269) and lasting until 273 when the Gallo-Roman emperor Tetricus I and his son Tetricus II were forced to abdicate (and were allowed to live in retirement!) in favor of the victorious central emperor Aurelian (270-275). Barbarous radiates imitated current issues, not issues from the distant past, usually of the Gallic emperors. Some, but only a small fraction, imitate the coins of the central emperors and the great majority of those are imitations of consecration issues of Claudius II (268-270). An imitation of Galienus is a rare find and it is very unusual to find a barbarous radiate whose prototype must be from Aurelian (270-275) or later. Imitations under Postumus are scarce and mostly close to full size. Imitations under Victorinus are also scarce.

These coins are often smaller than official coins. A large majority of imitations are of Tetricus I and II (270-273). Few of them are nearly full size–most are significantly smaller or much smaller and many are tiny. Unfortunately, the tiny ones rarely show a pleasing design, full-size imitations through are somewhat unusual..


 

 

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