Posted here are some of Life’s Little Gems.

is it worth detecting when all we find is rubbish ?


And we thought that the European Union were the first & only Europeans out to destroy England…

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5413607/Neolithic-farmers-wiped-Beaker-people.html

Timely Reminder…

By detectorist, Nov 6 2017 01:54PM

This lapel brooch was worn by those who had fought in the great war, and had been either discharged through illness or injury, this was first issued in 1916, with certificate;IMG_5193 (2)


Any Ideas…

By detectorist, Oct 30 2017 09:11PM Maud… By detectrist, Oct 29 2017 08:55AM a pretty little brooch from the 1800’s a pretty little brooch from the 1800’s first silver from my T2se, the first day, out, 0 comments Englands Hidden Gems… By detectrist, Oct 28 2017 09:19PM Amber from Brian Ridley Whitby Jet found by Brian Ridley, & kindly donated… Pudding Stone A Whitby Ammonite, a gift from my wife… The Ammonite, opened out, showing both halves, thank you Tracey… Another semi-precious stone supplied by Brian Ridley; A Cornelian… Collectong Fossils & Stones are all part of Treasure Hunting… Candle Snuffer found in 2016… By detectrist, Oct 24 2017 03:18PM How can a ceramic item, which looks so fragile survive ? A candle snuffer, with a will to survive… Found within a few inches from where a tractor had turned on the headland, and left a massive tyre track, the iron stain, you can see on the fractured surface is where an iron candlestick holder had all but rusted away… This has to be around about a hundred years old, as the old farmhouse was pulled down in the early 1920’s 0 comments Older The Roman Ninth Legion’s mysterious loss 16 March 2011 My take on this is below, which is a lot simpler… The disappearance of Rome’s Ninth Legion has long baffled historians, but could a brutal ambush have been the event that forged the England-Scotland border, thats the question posed by archaeologist Dr Miles Russell, of Bournemouth University. One of the most enduring legends of Roman Britain concerns the disappearance of the Ninth Legion. The theory that 5,000 of Rome’s finest soldiers were lost in the swirling mists of Caledonia, as they marched north to put down a rebellion, It is easy to understand the appeal of stories surrounding the loss of the Roman Ninth Legion – a disadvantaged band of British warriors inflicting a humiliating defeat upon a well-trained, heavily-armoured professional army. It’s the ultimate triumph of the underdog – an unlikely tale of victory against the odds. Recently, however, the story has seeped further into the national consciousness of both England and Scotland. were they Ambushed in Caledonia while fighting revolt, or destroyed in the Bar Kokhba Jewish revolt, or even wiped out in battle against the Parthians… The early years of the 2nd Century were deeply traumatic for Britannia. The Roman writer Fronto observed that, in the reign of the emperor Hadrian (AD 117 – 138), large numbers of Roman soldiers were killed by the British. The number and full extent of these losses remain unknown, but they were evidently significant. The anonymously authored Augustan History, compiled in the 3rd Century, provides further detail, noting that when Hadrian became emperor, “the Britons could not be kept under Roman control”. The British problem was of deep concern to Roman central government. Thanks to a tombstone recovered from Ferentinum in Italy, we know that emergency reinforcements of over 3,000 men were rushed to the island on “the British Expedition”, early in Hadrian’s reign. The emperor himself visited the island in AD 122, in order to “correct many faults”, bringing with him a new legion, the Sixth. The fact that they took up residence in the legionary fortress of York suggests that the “great losses” of personnel, alluded to by Fronto, had occurred within the ranks of the Ninth.
The Eagle of the Ninth found in the Netherlands…
The British problem was of deep concern to Roman central government. Thanks to a tombstone recovered from Ferentinum in Italy, we know that emergency reinforcements of over 3,000 men were rushed to the island on “the British Expedition”, early in Hadrian’s reign. The emperor himself visited the island in AD 122, in order to “correct many faults”, bringing with him a new legion, the Sixth. The fact that they took up residence in the legionary fortress of York suggests that the “great losses” of personnel, alluded to by Fronto, had occurred within the ranks of the Ninth.
Stamp of Legion IX Hispana
Archaeological evidence of the legion’s fate is scarce
Archaeological evidence of the legion’s fate is scarce, so could it seem that Sutcliff was right after all. It was the Ninth, the most exposed and northerly of all legions in Britain, that had borne the brunt of the uprising, ending their days fighting insurgents in the turmoil of early 2nd Century Britain. The loss of such an elite military unit had an unexpected twist which reverberates to the present day. When the emperor Hadrian visited Britain at the head of a major troop surge, he realised that there was only one way to ensure stability in the island – he needed to build a wall. Hadrian’s Wall was designed to keep invaders out of Roman territory as well as ensuring that potential insurgents within the province had no hope of receiving support from their allies to the north. From this point, cultures on either side of the great divide developed at different rates and in very different ways. The ultimate legacy of the Ninth was the creation of a permanent border, forever dividing Britain. The origins of what were to become the independent kingdoms of England and Scotland may be traced to the loss of this unluckiest of Roman legions… Dr Miles Russell is a senior lecturer in Prehistoric and Roman Archaeology at Bournemouth University. could all of the above be wrote of, simple by saying, after suffering a huge depletion of troops, they {the ninth} were incorperated into other legions and disbannded, ready to be raised againg, at a later date… ?