Buttons…

The first gilt buttons were made in Birmingham during the latter part of the eighteenth century, & produced cost effective way of making buttons look like gold, but without the cost, which made them hugely poplar,  this was before the Americans began making gilt buttons by around 1810, I have been told they stole the gilding secret from us brits, which was created by using Five grains of gold per gross (144) of buttons, this was then added to a mixture of mercury, which was then either dipped or brushed on the buttons before being placed in a furnace to cook, I assume that the treble gilt wrote on this button means it was brushed and cooked three times…. IMG_8522.JPGThe art of gliding buttons was widely known in the 18th century so I doubt our cousins over the pond did not do to much stealing… The writing on the back of the button ensured that this button was a quality button and not some cheaper version, because of quality issues the button makers guild lobbied Parliament for laws to keep the unscrupulous from gilding buttons with not enough gold; this then led to the required amount of 1/96th of an ounce of gold, to cover a button with the diameter of one inch;


musddyheruitage,com 003   Royal artillery Blouse button from the 1770’s, in quite good condition…


Show below; is the button of the 34th Northumberland Regiment, Raised in 1705, it has served this country well with campaign after campaign, untill the regiment was merged in 1881 with the Westmorland regiment and then with the borders to form the Borders Regiment… so a bit more investigation is needed to predetermine the age of this button, but we do know it is prior to 1881, and the other anomaly is there is no other button with the word regiment wrote on the button, in all the records so far it is just the 34th Northumberland… strange hey…


This is an excellent link for a brilliant website for military buttons, listed within the website is clear photos, and explanation as to the regiment, one of the better ID site’s…


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The easiest explanation as to know if you have found a Livery Button, is to follow this rule of thumb, is if it has a line underneath, either straight, twisted or any sort of line, then its more than likely a Livery Button ….


This is a small but informative website, from a women who does re-enactment from Queensland in New Zealand, quality pictures help with a precise ID, shame its not bigger, but it is another string to our bow…


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