When you consider that your metal detector is an investment, & a costly one at that, with a decent “motion” metal detector, that will actually find buried objects, starts from a hundred and sixty pounds for a C.Scope or a Teknetics, with the cost rising up to two thousand pounds plus, for other brands, to me that’s some kind of money to disregard… IMG_8253most detectors are “if careful” moisture resistant, in so much of the fact that a damp cloth will clean away even the most stubborn of dirt, before it stains the detector, but you have to keep on top of it, after all, would you take your computer outside and chuck into the mud outside…most detectors these days are nothing short of computors on a stick and as such need a little bit of careful handling… I know i am a hypocrite, because i have done the exact same thing only the other week and decided to carry on regardless, and then i had to spend nearly forty minutes carefully dismantling the Eldorado to clean it, before re-assembling it…

Perhaps you ought to think next time you put the detector into the boot of your car, how much vibration and clattering around it is receiving, without you giving it a second thought, even inside that padded carry bag it is only being cushioned to a certain degree, also how often is your detector left in a woeful condition after a hunt, is the coil clean, is the scuff cover fitted properly, is there any grit in between the cover and the coil, as this will cause untold problems sooner rather than later, hence why i do not believe in sealing the scuff cover and the coil tightly shut, giving that the whole detector takes less than ten minutes to clean and the coil would add nothing to that time, so i tend to clean the coil when everything else gets cleaned, so now it all gets cleaned as i go and i know that both the coil & machine are clean, particular the coil has no grit or dirt until they get cleaned again…

the base of the coil, showing the dirt that gets trapped there…
dirt, dust all gather in between the coil and the scuff cover…
a good stiff nylon brush, with a long handle, which allows a slow but careful cleaning process, with very good results…

 

 

 

 

Just think next time, that you have been out playing in the mud, or in a dusty environment, that your computer on a stick, might well do with a quick clean, without neglecting the covers that protect your investment, these are  there to protect them and should be clean and serviceable without too much dirt, especially inside the covers, making double sure that the detector carry bags are clean inside and the zips are easy to do up and undo, once any dirt and mud has been removed from the zips, use a dedicated spray for the zips, by spraying the zip, regularly it helps to keep the zip  running smoothly, & this will help keep it free running, & problem-free for a lot longer than a zip which has been neglected, remember that the zips always break at the most awkward time, or mine does at least…there is a huge amount of sprays which can be bought quite freely from any camping shop or online from ebay, amazon etc…

by spraying the zip, reguerly helps keep it running smoothly…
after a muddy hunt, both detector and spade need a good clean…

Spades and all digging equipment should be at least wiped clean, before bringing home half the field, no matter whether they are stainless steel or mild steel, the mud sticks to the spades & forks alike, grab a handful of grass, long or short it doest matter, then wipe the digging equipment of any excess soil…

Is it necessary to bring home half the field !

As for clothes and boots well that’s a personal choice…a good stiff nylon brush, with a long handle, which allows a slow but careful cleaning process, with very good results… So what happens when the metal detector stops working,  and you stand there blaming everybody and everything but yourself… you’re stuffed… that’s the bottom line…