Hammered Coins…

Another vast subject, so for the moment, i am going to put all of the Hammered Coins in chronological order, instead of separate pages, with links to useful pages externally, crossovers between the series is bound to happen, so i make no apologies;

Rome, like any successful Empire held the dominated country’s future and success in its hands, so when the withdrawal of Rome’s leadership in England, started around 400 AD,  and when Rome’s dominance over Europe and large swathes of various country’s, started to dwindle, apart from the obvious lack of military support and open to invasions, it left the various country’s with very little in the way of a monetary system, as in England, she was left with a void of good quality coinage, picfontbefore the hammered series of coinage emerged, with the Anglo Saxons;hayeswood 112 (4)

With the hammered coins lasting for nearly a thousand years, before the Hammered series of coins was superseded by the milled coinage, it all should somehow, fit into here….


Small Change…

Before the advent of farthings, halfpenny etc… a penny would be cut into the lower denomination [most commonly] using the cross situated on the reverse of the coins, in my opinion you should keep these “cut coins” safe, as historically they are the small change of our ancestors, & as far as i know, no one really collects these, except me perhaps, as the majority cannot be dated, or assigned to a monarch; quite a few people just put them in pile in a corner of a coin-box somewhere… but check them out, as there might be a rare coin in there somewhere, it’s not unheard off… this first link will take you to a site where you can find out the denominations for one particular period in time, very rarely as a detectorist will you need this information, but when you do, it’s a bugger to find, so I’ve put here for easy access…


hayeswood 112 (4)picfontThe link to this site gives a good up to date price guide for Anglo Saxon coins with good coin images, please note the “providence” notes, as these coins have been cross referenced several times for accuracy…

 


The internet has a plethora of sites dealings with hammered coinage,  and it can be a nightmare to sort out the good from the bad, whereas some are more interesting than others, and each good site helps with the purpose of identification, whereas some sites have a large turnover because they are an auction site,  – Another very knowledgeable website, rammed with information, again another sales site but full of potential, & one of the better ones…. i think an auction site is still a good visual ID site, with a good amount of accuracy, and full of everything most Detectorist’s might find…


 


Shown below is an exert from a study on coin tickets and how valuable they are for the pedigree of the coin…

As an example of how important information for a coin or artefact is, the coin shown above has no information, only a date stamp from when it was photographed, so what is the coin, and which period does it belong to, this is why the article below is so important, and goes a long way to put you on the right track…read the exert and then click the link for the in-depth reason of using coin tickets….

COIN TICKETS IN THE BRITISH HAMMERED SERIES

This paper arose from my conviction that a study, identifying the coin tickets written by notable collectors from the past and by major dealers in the British hammered series, would be both interesting and valuable. Scope of the study This paper is devoted to the British hammered series and the authors hope that it will  encourage experts in other series – such as milled coins and tokens – to carry out a similar study. The paper sets out to identify and illustrate the tickets written in the hands of notable deceased collectors and the personnel of leading UK-based dealers in the series, and to provide biographical notes on the collectors and dealers represented. The paper makes no pretence at completeness. The collectors included are those considered by the authors as ‘major’ and who were no longer living at the end of 2001. Where notable collections have been donated to or acquired by museums in their entirety – such as those of William Hunter and Sarah Sophia Banks – they have been excluded regardless of importance, for examples of their tickets (if they exist) will not come into the hands of later collectors. Beyond this, the authors freely recognise that through misjudgement or oversight certain collections may have been omitted which others consider have a persuasive claim to be represented. click here for the full story and the rest of the paper… 


this link below is an easy way to read a medieval coin, plus there are links within this article to take you further into reading hammered coins… these two papers follow on from each other….


hayeswood 112 (4)From the earliest Saxon coin, this humble pennyblackdog2 (2) as a coin, has dominated our coinage, and right into the 21st Century, it is still going strong, values and designs have changed but the need for a small denomination coinage has always been needed….

 


 


Henry V London penny found by & reproduced here, with permission from blackdog2 (2) Les the              Quartermaster at the NRH…blackdog (2)

 

 

 

 

 



Edward  Groats are the four pence pieces, whilst the half groats are the two pence pieces….

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