What we know about the world millions of years ago, comes from the study and conjecture of studying Fossilised remains; from giant dinosaurs to the tiny vertebrae, with everything thrown into the middle for good measure…



Puddingstone; Classed as an unusual rock in the world of geology, as seen in the picture below, it clearly shows what I call the front of the puddingstone, with the older flint being rounded off, & cemented together by a younger silica matrix [the silica acted like cement to keep all the stones together]IMG_5631 (2)

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Showing what I call the reverse of the Puddingstone [below] this was rescued from a garden in North Essex, this stone is believed to have come from the Essex / Herts Borders, i was lucky enough to have been in the garden when the garden was cleared, otherwise it would have ended up going to be re-cycled in the crusher… The rock contains many ovoid-shaped flints, coloured grey, black & brown, of varying sizes, in its silicate matrix…
Hertfordshire is renowned for puddingstone, which is a conglomerate sedimentary rock composed of rounded flint pebbles cemented together by a younger matrix of silica quartz, which binds it all together. The distinctive rock is largely confined to the English county of Hertfordshire but small amounts have been found in the pre-historic London Basin, where it stopped when it was washed down towards the North Sea…
Despite a superficial similarity to concrete, it is an entirely natural silcrete, a fracture could run across both the pebbles and the sandy matrix without any harm, as both have equal strength unlike concrete where the pebbles remain whole and the fracture occurs only in the cement matrix; Puddingstones derives its name from the manner in which the embedded flints resemble the plums in a Christmas pudding;


Below are just some of my own fossils, & represents the most common fossils that can be found;

Scientific name: Gryphaea…

Common name: Devils Toenail…

Biological rank: Genus…

Gryphaea, whose common name is the Devil’s toenail, is a genus of extinct oysters, a marine bivalve mollusc in the family group called Gryphaeidae;

These fossils range from the Triassic period to the late Paleogene period;

The Triassic period started at the end of the Permian period,; with the Triassic period beginning approximately 248 million years ago & this “geologic period & ecological system” lasted for approximately 50.5 million years (the Triassic period was the period of time before, maybe the most famous period of all time, the Jurassic Period) in Palaeontologist speak it ended about 206 million years ago;

shown above; Is the “Devils Toenail” this has to be one of the most common fossils, found in Britain. 


if you wish to know more about joining a fossils hunt, or even to book a hunt then click here

If you are interested in fossils or think you have found any fossils &, are on facebook, then pop into the search-area “mr woods fossils” & become friends, some very good up to date facts are posted along with various antidotes or if you need an ID, then have a look at this UK based facebook page, an excellent page with knowledgeable people…


Collecting Fossils & Stones are all part of Treasure Hunting;

A Whitby Ammonite, a gift from my wife…

Below is shown a gift, this time from my wife, who bought this from Mr Woods Fossils in Edinburgh, whilst we were visiting Edinburgh to watch the Military Tattoo, I happen to mention that you could hardly see the fracture in the nodule, and it looked untouched, almost whole…  I am not into buying fossils, artefacts etc.. I would much prefer to go and hunt for them myself, but as a gift “wow” what a gift, the whole thing has been spilt with one strike, with minimal damage to the outer nodule, leaving a thin outer  line where it split and an almost perfect centre, accentuating the positive and negative “inside” perfectly once opened, whilst being further enhanced & highlighted by a touch of Pyrite… a perfect Ammonite & a perfect gift… thank you…

Very well pleased with the  Whitby Ammonite; a very kind and thoughtful gift… thank you, Tracey…


I wonder if this applies to every find with a right or left curl


Homo erectus (meaning “upright man”, from the Latin “ērigere” which means “to put up” or “set upright”) he is an extinct species of hominin that lived throughout most of the Pleistocene geological epoch, with its earliest fossil evidence dating back 1.8 million years ago.                         Image result for homo erectus
Right from the start man has used hand tools fashioned from anything available, simply from poking a fire with a stick to stop burning himself, to deer antlers as weapons, bones as knives or sewing needles to join pelts together, thus being warm and less vulnerable to prey;

Of these artefacts the most we will find, unless we are extremely lucky will be a worked piece of stone, which are most commonly fashioned from flint, which in turn, can then be dated…

Before I go too far I will give a brief “Flint” synopsis’, and then re-direct you to a site far more knowledgeable on the subject… Flint remains very sharp, when first produced it must have been like a razor, as I have picked up a flint knife and although thousands of years old it was still wickedly sharp…

Flint which is often confused with another sedimentary rock called Chert, and visa-versa so who is right ?

Flint like other naturally occurring rocks, has particular quality’s which early man picked up on very quickly, as this material needed  no re-working to make an efficient tool, for example, the flint can be picked up and made into a very sharp cutting blade within seconds, whereas other tools need heating to be formed and shaped into an efficient blade… flint which has amongst its many uses has been used to shape tools such as knives, axes, scrapers to clean the skins of animals & spear tips, just to name a few, these tools are found by people all over the world, where ever flint naturally occurs…

Basically flint is found where an ocean once used to be, & today flint is often used by survivalist to create sparks for a fire, & so did early man, when struck with another stone or rock sparks will occur, these sparks are just minute fragments of iron, by exposing the iron this generates a rapid oxidation where the fragment can not dissipate the heat as fast as it generates it, so the rapidly forming spark is only a glowing piece of freshly exposed iron, hence the smell…

this site will lead you into the subject and give an idea of age to the hand tools you are most likely to find…


Picture1llThis hand axe above was found in Essex, in 1972, whilst hoeing sugar-beet, this was drawn & recorded for the Essex Archives…


more evidence that man is ever creeping back in time…


all the evidence points to man being very capable of surviving…


Fossils in Amber, incredible…