We all class Treasure as something Different, which is good, as there is something for everyone, and everyone can then have something !

We are basing the subject of Treasure as to what can be found within Great Britain, starting with the most poplar form of Treasure Hunting, this has to be using a metal detector, but other avenues to explore are dump digging, magnet fishing, rock-hounding for fossil’s to gem hunting etc…

Before we start and because nothing is in sequential order yet, I will just pop somethings that are of interest as a bit of a taster…so these are what I have to hand from the original website, these might still be of interest to someone or I want them in here as they were gifts and/or mean something to me…


Rock-Hounding;

Rocks having been formed billions of years ago, have always fascinated man, from the earliest man, shaping & forming a flint to create a cutting edge, to the modern day man  collecting and polishing semi preciouses stones…


England’s Hidden Gems…                      By detectorist, Oct 28 2017 09:19PM

These first three gems were all kindly given to me by Brain Ridley, after a discussion on the Northern Relic Hunters Forum…all were found by Brian in England &  then kindly given to me, that was such a fantastic gesture… Thank you Brain…


Amber from the “Brian Ridley Collection;”

Yes; apart from the “wash” of the tree bark there is a very small insect or something with spindly legs, encased inside [I know i’m wishful thinking, and the jury is still out “but”]….  how many millions of years old is this ? it took ages to work out how to view the inside, without damaging the Amber ” really” ! in the end we held it up against a powerful daylight lamp and then used a magnifying glass, although you could make out most of the details just by looking…

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Warm Amber

Whitby Jet found by Brian Ridley, & kindly donated from his collection..

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The above piece of Jet was found on the Yorkshire Coast at Whitby, Brian had started to polish this bueattfull piece of natural English Gem, prior to my acquisition, which is shown on the other side, whilst on this side it remains unpolished, Jet was all the rage in Victorian times in jewellery whether it was set in precious metal or non precious metal, as these pieces were used in mourning jewellery, especially made famous after Queen Victoria’s husband Albert died, leaving her a young widow, where until the day she died, she was always dressed in black, so a Black piece of Whitby Jet seemed appropriate…


Another semi-precious stone supplied by Brian Ridley; A Cornelian…

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An absolutely stunning piece; this is a semi-precious stone, showing a dull red or reddish-orange variety of chalcedony (quartz). used in jewellery such as rings, necklaces or brooches… these register 6.5 – 7 on the Mohs hardness scale:


Puddingstone; in the picture below it clearly shows what I call the front of the puddingstone, with the older flint being rounded off, & cemented together by a younger silica matrix [the silica acted like a cement to keep it all the stones together]IMG_5631 (2)

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Showing what I call the reverse of the Puddingstone [above] this was recued from a garden in North Essex, this stone is believed to have come from the Essex / Herts Borders, i was lucky enough to have been in the garden when the garden was cleared, otherwise it would have ended up going to be re-cycled in the crusher… The rock contains many ovoid shaped flints, coloured grey, black & brown, of varying sizes, in its silicate matrix.
Hertfordshire puddingstone is a conglomerate sedimentary rock composed of rounded flint pebbles cemented together by a younger matrix of silica quartz, which binds it all together. The distinctive rock is largely confined to the English county of Hertfordshire but small amounts have been found in the pre-historic London Basin, where it stopped, when it was washed down towards the North Sea…
Despite a superficial similarity to concrete, it is an entirely natural silcrete, a fracture could run across both the pebbles and the sandy matrix without any harm, as both have equal strength unlike concrete where the pebbles remain whole and the fracture occurs only in the cement matrix; Puddingstones derives its name from the manner in which the embedded flints resemble the plums in a Christmas pudding;

                                      thanks to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertfordshire_puddingstone


 Collecting Fossils & Stones are all part of Treasure Hunting;

That is my excuse, and im sticking to it…
A Whitby Ammonite, a gift from my wife…

Below is shown another gift, this time from my wife, my wife bought this from Mr Woods Fossils in Edinburgh, whilst we were visiting Edinburgh to watch the Military Tattoo, I happen to mention that you could hardly see the fracture in the nodule, and it looked untouched, almost whole…  I am not into buying fossils, artefacts etc.. I would much prefer to go and hunt for them myself, but as a gift “wow” what a gift, the whole thing has been spilt with one strike, with minimal damage to the outer nodule, leaving a thin outer  line where it split and an almost perfect centre, accentuating the positive and negative “inside” perfectly once opened, whilst being further enhanced & highlighted by a touch of Pyrite… a perfect Ammonite & a perfect gift… thank you…

Very well pleased with the above Whitby Ammonite; a very kind and thoughtful gift… thank you Tracey…

ive put this here in case you want to start collecting fossils yourself, as this is, a good place to start…      https://www.mrwoodsfossils.co.uk


a clever piece of wall art, given as a fathers day gift this year [2018] from the girls…a different piece of Treasure; but something to Treasure none the less…

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